My New Para-Thingy-Mabob

The all new Para- Daddy or maybe I should change his name to the “Para – Spider” or the ” Para-Thingy-Mabob” I’m open to suggestions, but it’s quite different to the original Para-Daddy. 

My recent run of blank days on streams has definitely not been for a lack of effort in my fly tying. I have been tying most days of the week over the last year or so, all be it maybe only one or two flies a day. My new J-Vice is standing ready to tie, whether it be on the kitchen counter or on the sofa as I pretend to listen to what Jenny Is saying to me from the kitchen. Jen has taken up crochet so it’s probably quite an amusing sight, the two of us nattering away as I tie flies and she practices her new crochet skills. 

I have been redesigning my favourite patterns by guessing that the trout will like my new offerings more than the last. The results so far in fish terms, are abysmal, but I blame that on the drought. I have changed many an old tried and tested pattern without even trying it out to see if it’s more effective. Hopefully when the fish return to my streams, they won’t be able to resist what I throw are at them. 

Last night I redesigned the Para-Daddy for the 4th time. The fly almost needs a new name by now. Maybe a Para-Spider is a more appropriate name because it’s really quite different from what it’s used to call a big daddy. 

The original Big Daddy which served me so well over the years. I still have this in my box for when I feel the need to use a dry fly / dropper rig. I don’t like using the others with a dropper ad the dropper often causes the fly to land on its side. With the Big Daddy that doesn’t matter.
The Big Daddy got himself a parachute and became a Para-Daddy. After learning to tie a Para-Rab, I decided that this was the head I needed for my Big Daddy, rather than the conventional catskill style hackle.
The Para-Daddy then lost his tail as I saw it an unnecessary addition to what was becoming more of a spider imitation that a buggy creation.
I reckon this is the real deal! This is now definitely a spider imitation. I wanted fewer but more defined legs but I kept the CDC parachute hackle for movement and bugginess. 
The two flies I tied last night. This fly is starting to look a little bit like Leonard Flemming’s Wolf spider.
I don’t know what different methods there are for tying those legs on but I just tied them on in a bunch and then pulled them round tying them in place as I went. Once they were distributed around the post I then split thread dubbed the CDC on around the post and the head. This fly floats like a cork and no floatant is required. In fact floatant will mess up the CDC so if any is applied then it should be applied to the long legs only. I also prefer it to float low in the water rather than high and dry. High and dry is easier for the fisherman to see that fly, but floating low will be easier for the fish to see. 

Here follows a basic SBS of my latest para-thingy-mabob:

A # 12 to 14 is my choice of hook. Spin on a small piece of red or orange deer hair which forms the hot spot once trimmed.  
Trim the body into the desired shape. I use a bit of the singe and snip method to get a nice neat body.
I had no idea how to tie the legs in so I just tied in half of the pheasant tail fibres facing forward and half backwards. Watch out for stray toddlers while you at it!
I then just tie them into position in a haphazard sort of way. There is probably a better way but I have yet to figure it out.
I then split thread dub some CDC around the post. You have to wind it in between the legs and try avoid trapping them. I also put a few wrap around the head so it creates a glorious buggy mess of a head.
An elegant mess of a head
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